Tag Archives: Beate Sonnenbeg

This new project by Beate Sonnenberg was shot for Hugo Boss.

Ma Vie Crystal was placed in a specially made perspex flower, designed to compliment Beate’s unique lighting set-up. Beate incorporates mirrors to form a body of radial light that appears to emit from the product. This angular light sits in juxtaposition to the soft pastel colours.

Using mirrors, perspex, and sculptural reliefs, Beate Sonnenberg continues her exploration with ‘Four Elements’, how light interacts with different surfaces and materials through the processes of refraction and reflection-. “I experiment with perspective, illusion and the configuration of geometric forms. I aim to question how we look and perceive, and how space can be used, appropriated and revealed.”

Beate takes much of the inspiration for these projects from the natural world, in the form of shapes, patterns, and textures. Beate says “Four Elements moves away from the calculated geometric precision of previous projects to explore the formalistic qualities of irregular, organic forms. Using digital projections depicting fire, earth, water, and earth, I have projected two-dimensional images onto an architectural arrangement of white blocks and mirror shards. By twisting and turning the sculptural reliefs into alternate configurations, the elemental qualities of each image are portrayed in different ways. Requiring very little post-production and an economy of the medium, mundane materials are transformed into curious and beautiful images through light and fragmented image.”

Unsurprisingly, a diamond was the seed for the series. The strongest and purest material known to man – A diamond in itself symbolises each of the four elements. “I wanted to use glass to replicate its cubic crystal structure and the magical way it disperses light into multifaceted perspectives. The sculpting of each still life reflects how diamonds are cut, shaped and transformed into desirable objects”

“My work is propelled by the drive to investigate the objects, shapes, and patterns that surround my everyday life. Whilst the aesthetic and conceptual discoveries I make are flavored by my past, my personality and my emotional responses to the world, I hope that my work can be open to interpretation to anyone, inspiring surprise, contemplation, and positivity.”

Tommy Hilfiger commissioned Beate Sonnenberg to photograph a new range of products from their European HQ.

Beate created a beautiful gif. to bring out the colorful and jazzy designs from the off-white background.

Beate takes a sneak peek into Gucci’s ‘Wonder Factory’ for Vogue’s latest feature.

The brief allowed Beate and her team to experiment with tiny forest sets. Each of which draw upon something unique look of each time-piece to create a phantasmagorical scene.

Click here to read the article..

The Sunday Times Style asked Beate Sonnenberg to photograph the newest hair range from Sisley.

With the new product being all about ‘Health & Hair’, Beate created a futuristic/medical look reminiscent of 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Beate was approached by Stylist magazine to create a vibrant set around these specially selected watches for a feature titled ‘Happy Hour’.

With the festivities underway, these images had to capture the party season whilst remaining nondescript for use through the year. Beate’s approach to lighting creates elongated form through the use of liquid each complementary to colours and watch strap materials.

Beate photographed replicas of the controversial substance known as cannabis for a Grazia Magazine feature titled “How cannabis Became Beauty’s Hottest Ingredient”

The known effects of smoking cannabis influenced the choice of lighting. Beate has purposely bounced light from multiple mirrors to create a psychedelic look and feel.

Grazia – by Perdita Nouril –
“It’s one of the world’s most controversial narcotics, but a growing number of beauty and wellness brands believe that a pair of cannabis-derived ingredients can revolutionise how we treat everything from acne to eczema and wrinkles.

The first, THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) is the most divisive. Of the 80 different cannabinoids harvested from the cannabis plant, it’s the one that gets you high. In countries where dope is legal, including some US states, THC has begun showing up in skincare thanks to its anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. But here, THC is banned – unless it features in concentrations below 0.3% it’s off limits.

This is where the second ingredient comes in. CBD (cannabidiol) is entirely non-psycho-active (so won’t make you high), legal everywhere and proving to have a wealth of beauty benefits. It’s also the active ingredient found in the Body Shop’s Hemp range. Launched in 1998, founder Anita Roddick was the first to bring cannabis to the high street and worked tirelessly to educate consumers on the difference between industrial-grade cannabis (known as hemp) and marijuana (the cannabis people smoke). Twenty years on, and a shift in attitude has meant that brands are no longer afraid to use the term cannabis when describing their products.”

Beate works together with The Sunday Times creative team to create these intricate features.

Originally the first image was going to feature flowers, to denote fragrance. However, the team did not feel it delivered a contemporary atmosphere so in its place, Beate layered blue shapes beneath the products.

Beate also photographed the red lipstick on a striped pattern to guide the eye and intersect hard shadows, all against a vibrant red background.

Beate shot this Avon Feature for Vogue, from her riverside studio.

Material and light work together in denoting a distinguished atmosphere. The hard edges of elegant materials sit in juxtaposition to the product curves. The serum is placed at an angle in the frame to communicate the rotation function and its infinite results.

In the foreground, a reflection of the product creates a red wisp of light.

 

Beate photographed and styled the image (left) for Vogue, working with the latest in new technology from GHD.